Sailboats

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RYD-16.2

Introducing - Murphy (RYD-16.2)


Designed for fairly rough water use, this half decked 17' 7" (5.35 m) sloop is a capable little boat and also available as two versions of a gaff cat.
   She was designed to suit stiff winds and sloppy seas. The dotted line in the sail plan shows a reduced Bermudian cat rig, where the mast is stepped in a forward socket. This reduces her area by about 32%, for breezy days
   The centerboard is fully enclosed in it's case and well shaped. Noted the sprit boom is curved, half wishbone style. This eliminates the need for a snotter and helps the fully rotating mast gain a better sail set.
   The mast is a composite of aluminum, with a wooden birdsmouth top. Very light and easy to make. An all wooden birdsmouth stick is an option.
Sloop deck plan
Engine well details
   Built in floatation chambers and lots of storage suit camp cruising and comfortable over-nighting.  She's a single chine, V bottom craft with a fairly fine entry and plenty of bearing area aft. She'll plane off with sufficient wind strength, though shouldn't be confused with a performance dinghy. PPI is 276 pounds and her hull weight is 325 pounds, so a nice, safe, novice to experienced skill level boat. that will not surprise you or display bad manners. Because she was designed for rough water use, her freeboard is a bit higher then usual, for a boat of this size and her sail area a tad less than typical, but still a capable sailor. A taller rig is available if desired.
RYD-16.2 GC
   She's a taped seam build (stitch and glue without the stitches) and quite simple. A couple of bulkheads, some partitions under the cockpit seats and some 1x2 (20x40 mm) stringers and cleats are all she is. A built in splash well keeps boarding water out and makes getting at the outboard easier.

Two gaff cat sail plans has been drawn up and she preforms well in this role. The gaff is handled by a single halyard, saving some line and simplifying the rig further. Again the fixed sprit boom is used or a conventional boom can be employed.

Her principle dimensions are:

LOD  17' 7" (5.36 m)
LWL 16' 2"  (4.93 m)
Beam 6' 2"   (1.87 m)
Draft  7"       (178 mm)
Disp. 788 lbs. (357.4 kg)
Weight 325 lbs. (147)

Build photos in plan set
Beetle Cat rig option
A light, yet tough boat, able to stand up to most that mother nature sends your way. She'll take more than most skippers can tolerate. As with all, plans are available in imperial and metric and include; lines, offsets, sail, spar, rudder, centerboard, station molds, fore hatch, bulkheads, blocks, engine well, plywood panel layout and construction drawings. Also included are rough assembly guides, building tips and tricks, BOM, assembly photos and epoxy use techniques.
   Study plans are $20 (USD) if hard copy and $15 for a downloaded version. Hard copy plans are shipped free to any continental USA address, while all others will require a shipping quote. Plans are printed on oversize, acid free stock in full color. Full plan sets are $80 (USD).

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You may have noticed by now, my designs have a name and a number associated with them. The name is usually the first one given them by their owner, though sometimes I give them one or use an owners actual name. The RYD designation (Riccelli Yacht Design) is the model number and a way I can quickly tell which boat is what. This number is it's waterline length and a fairly recent development. Some time ago, I was converting old hand drawn designs to digital and had a problem with my model numbering system. I was using length mostly, as the model number and had a bunch of RYD-18's, RYD-24's, etc., so I started using prefixes and suffixes, which just made things worse. Eventually, I settled on using the LWL figure, as it's typically unique to each design. I still toss in a suffix or two, but now these delineate differences within the model, such as rig type or build style. For example the gaff cat version of Murphy has a GC after it's model number. This way I can send the appropriate files for the version someone has ordered, without having to open the file to check.

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Introducing - Rocky (RYD-16.9)

 

This boat was originally designed as a sloop for coastal cruising, in skinny waters. The boat was built, but the rig was never installed, instead used as a "putt putt" or displacement speed motor cruiser. The centerboard case was built, but the builder changed his mind and it was eventually capped from below. Other changes he made were to not install the rudder and to move the offset outboard well, to the middle of the transom. This arrangement, first with a 5 HP long shaft and currently with an 8 HP long shaft has served well, offering exceptionally fuel efficient operation.
   Since then and as often is the case in design work, another person was interested, so changes where made and she's a sailboat again, this time as a ketch. She's a fairly modest aspect ratio Bermudian ketch with sprit booms. The booms are curved (half wishbone), the mizzen is fully rotating and free standing (no wires). The main is lightly stayed to hold up the jib and uses a conventional sprit arrangement with a snotter on a fixed mast. The rig is completely self tending with the boomed jib. This is a very handy rig, especially if you don't like to be tweaking strings all the time. Just put the helm down and around she comes. Rocky has also been done up in a Gaff or Bermudian sloop version, which simplifies the rig a tad, though she loses some of her charm. The Bermudian sloop is fractionally rigged and will be the best on the wind.
   Down below, she's wide open. No centerboard case to trip over, no compression post under the mast, just a big V berth and lots of storage space. All the way forward is an anchor rode locker which could be used as a collision bulkhead. Aft of this is a nearly 8' long (2.3 m) V berth. The aft end of this long berth, can be stopped short and cabinets installed if desired. Under the port side of the V berth is the centerboard case, which is about 9" (228 mm) off the centerline. Hidden under the V berth, it leaves the cabin interior completely free of the usual obstructions in a shoal draft boat. The offset centerboard doesn't detract from performance and is a common tactic in skinny water boat designs.
Note 5 panel planking layout
   The sections show a 5 panel, multi chine layout. This permits good internal volume, desirable in a cruiser and also offers a flat bottom panel, which can take to the beach easily. The bottom panel is double planked from 3/8" (9 mm) or 1/2" (13 mm) plywood, depending on how tough you'd like her to be. The skeg aft is the same depth of the bottom's lowest point, so she takes to groundings bolt upright. She can dry out on a tide and float off without worry. As you can see the sections show some power aft and a fine entry with some reserve to prevent plunging. The flat bottom panel also means no garboard planks to deal with.
   Rocky is designed to sail well, but predictably. She will plane, but needs a fresh breeze for this. Her buttock angles are too steep for sustained plane mode, but a safe, comfortable cruiser is her intent, not dinghy performance levels. She still has the sloop rig option available in both gaff or Bermudian. Both of the sloop rigs are simpler builds, if for no other reason then one less stick to build. The cabin offers full sitting headroom and storage for a porta-pottie is available.
Ketch steering arrangement. The sloops use a regular tiller.
   Shown here is the forward cabin bulkhead. This is the reason she hasn't a compression post under the mast. The dashed line on deck is the tabernacle, which lets the mast fold down for transport or getting under bridges. Construction details can be seen in this drawing, making her taped seam build obvious. Click on this image and blow it  up to see the details.
   The cabin roof has three build options, strip planked, foam cored with plywood skins or traditional plywood over beams.
   As usual, the plans are fully detailed and you can solve most issues by just studying them carefully.
   The ketch requires a unique steering arrangement, as the mizzen is in the way of a tiller. This is shown at the right and it's as simple as the rest of the boat. The tiller still pivots up to clear the cockpit and is linked to the rudderhead by a rod. Again, click on this and have a look. All plans are well laid out and easy to understand.

Her principle dimensions are:
LOD    18'           (5.46 m)
LWL    16' 9"       (5.1 m)
Beam    6' 9"        (2.05 m)
Draft     10" - 3' 2"    (266 mm - .96 m)
Hull weight     650 lbs.    (295 kg)
SA/D             153 sq. ft.         
D/L                151
PPI                 339 lbs.   (154 kg)

Study plans are $25 (USD) if hard copy and $20 for a downloaded version. Hard copy plans are shipped free to any continental USA address, while all others will require a shipping quote. Plans are printed on oversize, acid free stock in full color. Full plan sets are $180 (USD).


Introducing Emily Rose (RYD-21.7)

A healthy cruiser in a traditional fashion, yet with modern appendages, modern materials and building techniques.

   This is a large vessel, in spite of her relatively modest on deck length. A long build should be anticipated on a yacht like this, simply because of the scale of things. Just hoisting up a ballast will require some thought and planning as it's not a light thing.
   Shown with a fiddled topmast on the main and square courses on the fore a grand sight. The plans were not delivered with the square course details worked out, I managed to talk the client out of them, but he did insist on the fiddled top main. I tried, but eventually caved. I would prefer a different pole mast arrangement for the main, as there are better topsail options than a fiddled topmast.

   A recent upgrade to this design is a new Indianhead bow profile and a counter stern extension. The counter stern is better mannered in following seas and the new bow profile lengthens the LWL slighted when heeled and happens to be my favorite shape.
   Her accommodations show the effects of a modest LWL, as there's a good bit of overhang, robbing it's length. The V berth is large and has lots of stowage under it, as do the built in cabinets aft of it to either side. The companionway is offset slightly to place the galley sink closer to the centerline, but will not affect the down flooding situation if heeled way over. The cockpit also has lots of stowage.
   The engine is under the bridge deck and accessible through a hatch there or behind the companionway ladder.

Her principal dimensions are:

LOD                                  26' 7"  (8.1 m)
LWL                                  21' 7  (6.58 m)
Beam                                 8' 3"   (2.5 m)
Draft                                  3'  (.9 m)
Displacement                     6,195 lbs.  (2,810 kg)
Ballast                               1,800 lbs. (29%)
Sail area                            317 sq. ft.   (29.4 sq. m)
SA/D                                 15.1 (working sails)
D/L                                    273
AVS                                   131.2 degrees
PPI                                     636

   Construction is strip planked, though cold molded and glued lapstrake are also possible. Her appendages are modern and well shaped, considering her rig and performance envelope expectations. She's fairly light for her size, though not overly so, as trade winds and offshore work is what she's designed to tolerate.
   Her lines show good balance and will offer a comfortable, easy motion in most any sea state. Her spars are hollow (for the most part) and construction details are kept light, but stiff and strong.
   Study plans are $25 (USD) if hard copy and $20 for a downloaded version. Hard copy plans are shipped free to any continental USA address, while all others will require a shipping quote. Plans are printed on oversize, acid free stock in full color. Full plan sets are $260 (USD).

Introducing - Sabor (RYD-14.6)

   As you might be able to see, she's really only intended for one thing - to scoot and quickly at that. RYD-14.6 was developed to bring high performance to the backyard builder. Her sides and bottom can be managed from a few pieces of plywood, without scarfs or scabbing on little bits to make up her length.

Principle dimensions:

LOD                            15' 6"  (4.72 m)
LWL                            14. 6"  (4.4 m)
Beam                           4'  (1.21 m)
WL beam                     3' 6"  (1.06 m)
Draft                           (up) not much  (down) 3' 4"  (1.01 m)
Displacement              255 lbs. at 4"  (115 kg. at 102 mm)
Dry hull weight           150 lbs.  (68 kg)
D/L                              36
Sail area                      108 sq. ft.  (10 sq. m)
SA/D                           27.8
Cp                               .59

   Her rig can be custom as drawn or you can use one of over a dozen one design rigs, from such boats as the 420 or Jet 14. As drawn, her performance will be much like a Windmill, though she looks a bit better to me. She'll get up on full plane in 8 knots of wind and her narrow beam insures you don't have much to hold you back.

   Her cockpit is self draining, missing the transom, the appendages are well shaped and her floatation chambers designed for hiked out seating. A dozen sheets of plywood and some epoxy is all it takes to build one.

Study plans are $20 (USD) if hard copy and $15 for a downloaded version. Hard copy plans are shipped free to any continental USA address, while all others will require a shipping quote. Plans are printed on oversize, acid free stock in full color. Full plan sets are $80 (USD).

Introducing Discrete (RYD-14.11)


Discrete is a real ocean capable, little cruiser. Her stability range is very high and she's about as small a boat, as I'd want to go out into deep blue water with. She's built stoutly and her scantlings are well above what she might encounter in a storm.
   She has lots of options available, from build method types to cabins shapes, bow profiles, 3 different draft options, two rigs, round and multi chine hull shapes and more.
   She can be built as a glued lapstrake or strip planked round bilge. A molded version is possible, though yet spec'd up. The multi chine version has 3 panels per side and closely mimics the round bilge shape. These versions are intended for taped seam, plywood construction.
   The gaff sloop shown to the right has the clipper knee bow, with trail boards and all. The schooner rig version shows the spoon bow (which I prefer), the cuddy cabin and the unique rig. West coast lumber schooners used this rig, with a loose footed or lug foresail. It's a powerful sail, but not as handy to windward. This is fine, because the schooner rig has never been known as a handy rig to windward anyway. A stretched version of this boat is also available.
   The stretched version is 20' on deck and can additionally have a counter stern installed, which brings her to about 22' on deck. These stretched versions and the schooner rig are only available in the deep draft, round bilge hull form. I haven't run the numbers on the other draft options, but I'll bet she's stiff enough to at least carry the schooner rig. Lastly, fiddled topsails have been drawn for the stretched schooner, which really adds light air power, but also considerably more complication to an already complex rig.


Her general dimentions are:

LOA (spared)                          24’ 6” (7.46)
LOD                                        18’ 3”  (5.5 m)
LWL                                        14’ 11”  (4.5 m)
Beam                                       6’ 6”  (1.98 m)
WL beam                                 5’ 4”  (1.6 m)
Draft                                        27”, 33” or 39”  (686, 838 or 991 mm)
Sail area                                  207 sq. ft.  (19.2 sq. m)
Displacement                           2,674 pounds  (1213 kg)
Ballast ratio                             34%
PPI                                            298 lbs.  (135 kg)
SA/D                                        16.8
D/L                                           358
Angle of vanishing stability      134 degrees


   Discrete has nicely balanced lines and is an easily driven hull form. She'll display no bad habits or manners underway, regardless of wind strength. The shoal draft version has a centerboard that's housed completely within the appendage, so it doesn't intrude into the cabin spaces, as is often the case with centerboard boats.
   She's a real little ship and will bring you home with comfort and safety, a feature just not seen in most 18' sailors.
   Study plans are $25 (USD) if hard copy and $20 for a downloaded version. Hard copy plans are shipped free to any continental USA address, while all others will require a shipping quote. Plans are printed on oversize, acid free stock in full color. Full plan sets are $180 (USD).







RYD-14.6 is intended to bring performance to back yard builders. Her flanks and bottom can be managed from a few pieces of plywood, no scarfs or scabbing little bits on to make up the length.  Her rig can be custom as drawn or she could wear a number of modern production boat rigs, in her size range, such as the 420 or Jet 14. As drawn, her performance level will be much like a Wind Mill, though she looks a whole lot better. With more area rigs, she’ll really fly.  RYD-14.6 fine entry, V hull form will permit full plane in 8 knots of wind and the narrow beam insures you don’t have much to hold you back. The cockpit is self draining, missing the transom, the appendages well shaped and her floatation chambers are designed for hiked out seating. A dozen sheets of plywood and some epoxy is all it takes to get her built.  - See more at: http://www.woodenboat.com/boat-plans-kits/sabor-ryd-146-2#sthash.O6fBj1Si.dpuf


RYD-14.6 is intended to bring performance to back yard builders. Her flanks and bottom can be managed from a few pieces of plywood, no scarfs or scabbing little bits on to make up the length.  Her rig can be custom as drawn or she could wear a number of modern production boat rigs, in her size range, such as the 420 or Jet 14. As drawn, her performance level will be much like a Wind Mill, though she looks a whole lot better. With more area rigs, she’ll really fly.  RYD-14.6 fine entry, V hull form will permit full plane in 8 knots of wind and the narrow beam insures you don’t have much to hold you back. The cockpit is self draining, missing the transom, the appendages well shaped and her floatation chambers are designed for hiked out seating. A dozen sheets of plywood and some epoxy is all it takes to get her built.


DESIGN SPECS
Designer:
Paul "PAR" Riccelli
Year of Design:
2008
LOA:
15' 6"
Beam Length:
4' 2"
Draft Length:
not much
Displacement:
255 lbs. at 4"
Materials:
Wood
Fiberglass
Skill Level to Build:
Handy novice
- See more at: http://www.woodenboat.com/boat-plans-kits/sabor-ryd-146-2#sthash.O6fBj1Si.dpuf
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